Tag: fuel rebel

M18 fuel from UK to rebel in Syria: Why UK has a key role

By Kate KellawayThe UK has provided a key military ally in the fight against the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq, providing fuel for the rebels as they battle the jihadists.

Britain is also one of a number of Western countries that have provided military support to the Syrian government in its battle against the jihadist group.UK Prime Minister Theresa May has been in a tight race with President Bashar al-Assad to form a government after Britain voted to leave the European Union last month.UK President Donald Trump and his allies in Congress have warned that a victory for the Syrian regime over the rebels could spark an all-out war in the Middle East.

The UK’s role in the war against the jihadists has been controversial.

The US has been accused of deliberately weakening the opposition by supporting the Assad regime and the rebels against one another, while Moscow has called on the US to intervene in Syria to stop the killing of civilians.

The two nations are now at odds over the future of the US-backed Syrian opposition and how it should proceed.

The British military has been carrying out air strikes against Islamic State targets in Syria, but has also used Britain’s own weapons to target the jihadists’ supply lines in the country.

According to a US government source, the UK has supplied fuel to the rebels with its M18 tankers, which the government has also been using to transport military supplies to the war-torn country.

The fuel is sourced from the UK, the source told Business Insider.

It was the first fuel shipment for the rebel fighters since they launched their offensive last week against the extremist group.

The United States is now pushing the Syrian Government to provide fuel for its fighters to get into and out of the country, a senior US official told Reuters on Thursday.

A senior Syrian military source told Reuters that the government had “a list of 10 to 15 million litres of fuel” it is using to move supplies to and from the Syrian military’s base in Hama province.

The Syrian Government has said it is still able to meet its fuel needs due to the continued supply of fuel to it from Britain.

A new chemical used to make biofuels is causing the same symptoms as the fuel pump syndrome.

A chemical used in the biofuel industry to make ethanol was found to be toxic to animals, and the National Academy of Sciences has warned that the industry is “playing with fire” by producing biofuils that are not safe for animals.

In a statement, the NAS says the chemical, nametestosterone, was discovered in the mid-2000s and has since been used to manufacture a wide range of biofules including corn, soybean, and cotton.

Nametostosterone is used to produce the most common biofuel in the world, but it has been linked to toxic and fatal effects for many species.NAS warns that the toxic effects of the chemical can be “transformed into a more serious problem” if it is used in animals and that there is a “lack of regulation and public understanding” of the chemicals risks.

The agency cites several cases of animals suffering from symptoms similar to the fuel-pump syndrome, and urges the biofuel industry to do more to avoid its use in the future.

“In recent years, the bioenergy industry has made progress in minimizing the use of biofuel ingredients that could potentially lead to adverse animal health effects, but there is still much work to be done,” the statement reads.

“It is important to remember that the safety of bioenergy products is determined by the best available science, and not by the industry’s own claims.

The NAS and its advisory panel should continue to provide advice and advice to the bioengineered feedstock industry to minimize the potential for adverse animal reactions, and to make it easier for consumers to buy biofuellas that are safe for their animals.”

Namestosterone was discovered as an agricultural feedstock in the late 1970s.

It is derived from a plant that grows in a soil-dwelling species called Sphaerocarpus.

The company that developed it, Dow Chemical, says the plant was first used in its biofuel, the Xtend, in 1984, but that its use has since dropped off as it became cheaper and more readily available.

The biofuel is currently produced by Dow’s subsidiary, Advanced Biomass Technologies.

Dow says it uses the chemical to create the biofiber that makes up most of its biofuene products.

Dow Chemical said that it has not yet identified a safety issue with the bioflavonoids in the chemical.

In the statement, Dow said that while its bioflavored biofuel products are produced using the same feedstocks and ingredients as the Xtsend, the product is not derived from the Xten or Xtene bioflavanols that have been linked with the fuel pumps syndrome in the past.

The statement also said that Dow does not have a current plan to stop using the chemical in the near future.

It added that the company is “taking steps to ensure that any use of the bioengineering ingredient in the products we produce will meet industry-standard safety requirements and standards for safe food and feedstuffs.”

The biofuelling industry is increasingly focusing on the development of cheaper biofuil ingredients.

For instance, the Biofuel Alliance is working with Dow Chemical and other companies to develop bioflattened vegetable oils and fats that will use the same chemicals that are in the Xtan bioflava used in biofuel.